Dr Fatima Perez de Heredica Benedicte

Session 3: Decolonising weight management: ethnicity-related differences in obesity
14 December 8–9pm
Dr Fatima Perez de Heredia Benedicte, Senior Lecturer in Physiology, School of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University

The session discusses the paper: Sinaga et al. 2021. Ethnic-specific body fat percent prediction equation as surrogate marker of obesity in Ethiopian adults. Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition 40:17

We will discuss data showing obesity disparities among different ethnicities. In particular, how obesity indices and references developed for Caucasian populations are inadequate for the Ethiopian population, and how researchers overcome this barrier.

Virtually all scientific papers can be accessed online via sci-hub (including this one).

Session 3 Details

CONTENT AND LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
Clear understanding of:
• Methods to diagnose and classify obesity
• Health implications of obesity

Be aware of:
• Gender- and ethnicity-related gaps in biomedical data
• Potential publication biases

Be able to:
• Understand the differential impact of obesity on populations of different characteristics
• Critically evaluate obesity-related data, from a gender/ethnic perspective
• Critically analyse weight management protocols, with a gender/ethnic perspective

About Expert Reviewer Dr Fatima Perez de Heredia Benedicte

I am a biologist passionate about the physiology of nutrition, obesity, and adipose tissue. In particular, the links between nutritional status, adiposity and inflammation fascinate me.
My current research looks into a dietary and exercise intervention for improving body composition and cardiometabolic risk in cardiac rehabilitation patients.

Dr Neil Williams Senior Lecturer in Exercise Physiology and Nutrition within the Department of Sport Science at Nottingham Trent University

Session 2: Can probiotics reduce gastrointestinal complaints in athletes?
16 November 8–9pm
Connor Parker, Academic Associate and PhD Researcher in Exercise Physiology, Nottingham Trent University.

The session discusses the paper: Pugh, J.N., Sparks, A.S., Doran, D.A. et al. Four weeks of probiotic supplementation reduces GI symptoms during a marathon race. Eur J Appl Physiol 119, 1491–1501 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-019-04136-3

The paper explores the use of a probiotic supplement to reduce the incidence and severity of gastrointestinal symptoms in marathon runners. We will be covering tools and techniques to help you best understand and appraise this research paper, through both critical examination and discussion.

Virtually all scientific papers can be accessed online via sci-hub (including this one).

Session 2 Details and Slides

CONTENT AND LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
Clear understanding of:
• Prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms in athletes
• How exercise can influence gut permeability and damage
• The use of probiotic supplements in athletes

Be aware of:
• Methodological considerations for human nutrition intervention trials
• Different strains of probiotics in supplements
• Considerations for research trials in athletes

Be able to:
• Interpret data from a human intervention trial
• Understand if the data can apply to real-world settings and athletes
• Critically analyse research in order to apply it in performance nutrition


Slides from the session are available to download and keep for your records.

About Expert Reviewer Connor Parker

Connor Parker is an academic associate and PhD researcher in exercise physiology at Nottingham Trent University. His research is primarily focused on nutritional interventions that improve athlete health and performance through modulation of the gut microbiota. His other research interests include the impact of exercising in extreme environments on gut health.

Session 1: Effectiveness of workplace wellness programmes – systematic reviews and meta-analyses
Dr Sue Reeves, Head of Undergraduate Studies and Student Experience, Department of Life Sciences, University of Roehampton. Chaired by Dr Caroline Elizabeth Childs BSc (Hons) PhD RNutr.

The session discusses the paper: Effectiveness of workplace wellness programmes for dietary habits, overweight and cardio metabolic health – systematic reviews and meta-analyses

This paper considers the effectiveness of workplace wellness programmes on dietary habits, weight and cardiometabolic health, but also presents an opportunity to consider what the terms ‘systematic review’ and’ meta-analysis’ mean

Virtually all scientific papers can be accessed online via sci-hub (including this one).

Session 1 Details and Slides

CONTENT AND LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
Clear understanding of:
• Systematic reviews
• Meta-analyses

Be aware of:
• Variations in study design
• Potential sources of bias in the reporting of research studies|
• Recent changes to the working environment

Be able to:
• Read and critique a scientific paper
• Consider the context of the research conducted


Slides from the session are available to download and keep for your records.

About Expert Reviewer Dr Sue Reeves

Dr Sue Reeves is the Head of Undergraduate Provision and Student Experience in the Department of Life Sciences at the University of Roehampton. She is a Senior Fellow of the HEA, a Registered Nutritionist and Fellow of the AfN, where she is also a CPD assessor and Regional Rep.

Season 2 schedule

All sessions are on Tuesdays, 8–9pm

• 12 October: Effectiveness of workplace wellness programmes – systematic reviews and meta-analyses Dr Sue Reeves
• 16 November: Athlete Nutrition Connor Parker
• 14 December: Decolonising Obesity Dr Fatima Perez de Heredia Benedicte
• 11 January: Diabetes No Mare: A Dream Coming True Professor Mike Lean
• 8 February: TBC Dr Sue Reeves
• 15 March: Health before Pregnancy to Improve Outcome of Pregnancy Dr Angela Flynn

Once you have viewed a full recorded session the mynutriweb team will review and arrange to send you your certificate via email from hello@mynutriweb.com within two weeks of viewing the session.

CPD CERTIFICATE & LEARNING MATERIALS

This season has been CPD approved by the British Dietetic Association (BDA) and the Association for Nutrition (AfN).