£30

6hours 30mins

Preconception and pregnancy nutrition and health

Early life nutrition masterclass

Thursday 16 June 2022
10:00–16:30 BST • 11:00–17:30 CET

6hr 30mins

Preconception and pregnancy nutrition and health

Early life nutrition masterclass

Thursday 16 June 2022
10:00–16:30 BST • 11:00–17:30 CET

6hr 30mins

£30

6hour 30mins

OPEN TO ALL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS, TUTORS AND STUDENTS

The health of a woman* prior to conception and during pregnancy has a significant impact on pregnancy outcomes and may have a lifelong impact on child health. This full day masterclass will cover early-life nutrition research and provide evidence-based recommendations prior to and during pregnancy. It will feature experts covering the latest science to impact practice and advice.

The increase in obesity prevalence among women of reproductive age, along with pre-existing and gestational diabetes, and pre‐eclampsia, can have detrimental effects on maternal and infant health. Equally, pregnancies complicated by hyperemesis gravidarum and suboptimal maternal dietary patterns in general can lead to micronutrient deficiencies.

Preconception and pregnancy are often viewed as a particularly receptive time for people to engage with information about health-related behaviours to optimise the health of their unborn child.​

The masterclass will cover:

  • Preconception and interconception nutrition and lifestyle
  • Pregnancy preparation in women with type 2 diabetes
  • Maternal nutritional interventions
  • Hyperemesis gravidarum
  • Gestational diabetes
  • Calcium and pre-eclampsia
  • Plant-based diets in pregnancy

This masterclass costs £30 to attend and has been designed for all professionals working in the area of early life nutrition – in particular, dietitians, nutritionists, health visitors, midwives, GPs, practice nurses and community pharmacists – as well as tutors and students. A 50% student discount is available. See frequently asked questions

 

*The terms woman/women will be used throughout this symposium, however the content may also apply to those who are pregnant or planning a pregnancy but hold a different gender identity (non-binary or transgender). It is important to ensure that the terms used in practice are personalised to individual patients.

CHAIRS:

Dr Angela Flynn Lecturer in Nutritional Sciences, Department of Nutritional Sciences, King’s College London
Dr Sara White Clinician Scientist and Maternal Diabetes Clinical Research Lead, Department of Women and Children’s Health, King’s College London

Melissa Mogor

Programme outline

10:00–10:10

Chairs introduction

Dr Angela Flynn
Lecturer in Nutritional Sciences, Department of Nutritional Sciences, King’s College London

Dr Angela Flynn’s biography
Dr Flynn is a Lecturer in Nutritional Sciences in the Department of Nutritional Sciences at King’s College London. She started her career as a community pharmacist in Ireland and subsequently completed an MSc in Nutrition followed by a PhD in Maternal Nutrition at King’s College London. Her research focuses on interventions that aim to improve outcomes for women before, and during pregnancy, particularly women at risk of developing gestational diabetes. Other interests include examining the relationship between maternal micronutrient status and pregnancy outcomes.
Melissa Mogor

Dr Sara White
Clinician Scientist and Maternal Diabetes Clinical Research Lead, Department of Women and Children’s Health, King’s College London and Honorary Consultant in Metabolic Medicine (Clinical Biochemistry), Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust

Dr Sara White’s biography

Dr Sara White is a Metabolic Physician with clinical expertise in diabetes in pregnancy. During her PhD she investigated early pregnancy gestational diabetes (GDM) prediction and metabolic profiles amongst obese women with GDM. Her research explores GDM pathophysiology and stratification of potential subtypes, plus ways to improve outcomes in at-risk women.

Melissa Mogor

10:10 – 10:50

Calcium for prevention of pre-eclampsia

Professor Laura Magee
Professor of Women’s Health, King’s College London, King’s College London

Professor Laura Magee’s biography

Professor Laura Magee is a general obstetric internist (Internal Medicine and Clinical Pharmacology, Royal College of Canada); Fellow ad eundem, Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, UK; and Co-President, International Society for the Study of Hypertension in Pregnancy. She is a Professor of Women’s Health, King’s College London, UK.

Session outlines and learning objectives

Inadequate dietary calcium intake is common and calcium replacement in women with insufficient dietary intake reduces the risk of pre-eclampsia and is effective in populations with low average calcium intake, regardless of baseline pre-eclampsia risk. Receiving calcium in high- or low-dose appear to be similarly effective for pre-eclampsia prevention. This session will explore the research supporting the use of calcium in the prevention of pre-eclampsia.

Watch this session to:

GAIN CLEAR UNDERSTANDING OF:

  • Evidence about calcium intake and pre-eclampsia prevention
  • How the effectiveness is focussed on women with average low calcium intake
  • How effectiveness does not depend on the risk of pre-eclampsia, whether calcium is given before or after 20 weeks’ gestation, or with/without vitamin D

BE AWARE OF:

  • The absence of adequate biomarkers
  • How adequacy of calcium intake can be measured
  • The logistic issues around prescribing calcium in pregnancy

BE ABLE TO:

  • Explain how calcium may work to decrease pre-eclampsia
  • Prescribe or recommend calcium for pre-eclampsia prevention
  • Explain how calcium is complementary to aspirin
Dr Fabrice DeClerck Science Director, EAT

10:50 – 11:30

Type 2 diabetes – who is prepared for pregnancy?

Dr Rita Forde
Lecturer in Long-term Conditions and Reproductive Health, Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Palliative Care at King’s College London

Dr Rita Forde’s biography:

Dr Rita Forde is a lecturer in the Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Palliative Care at King’s College London. Rita’s research focuses on diabetes with a special interest in diabetes and women’s health. She is currently investigating strategies to increase the uptake of pre-pregnancy care for those with type 2 diabetes.

Session outlines and learning objectives
Inadequate pre-pregnancy care increases the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Approximately 90% of women living with type 2 diabetes do not meet the NICE criteria for diabetes related pre-pregnancy care. In the UK, women living with type 2 diabetes account for over half of all pregnancies in those with pre-existing diabetes.

Watch this session to:

GAIN CLEAR UNDERSTANDING OF:

  • The relationship between diabetes and pregnancy
  • The criteria for pre-pregnancy care for women living with type 2 diabetes
  • The importance of care pre-pregnancy care for women living with type 2 diabetes

BE AWARE OF:

  • The incidence of type 2 diabetes pregnancy
  • The risks for adverse pregnancy outcomes
  • How to enhance pre-pregnancy care for women living with type 2 diabetes

BE ABLE TO:

  • Explain the importance of pre-pregnancy care for women living with type 2 diabetes in a way that is meaningful to a lay audience.
  • Illustrate understanding of the NICE pre-pregnancy care criteria.
  • Incorporate assessment of pregnancy intentions into the routine care of women living with type 2 diabetes during their reproductive years.

11:30 Break

Melissa Mogor

11:40 – 12:20

Nutrition and lifestyle before and between pregnancies

Dr Danielle Schoenaker
Research Fellow, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital

Dr Danielle Schoenaker’s biography
Dr Danielle Schoenaker is an epidemiologist with an interest in preconception health and care. Her research has examined how nutrition and lifestyle before and between pregnancies may influence women’s risks of developing pregnancy complications, and how these may in turn influence growth across childhood and adolescence in the next generation. Her ongoing research explores how women and their partners can be best supported to optimise their health and circumstances in preparation for pregnancy and parenthood.
Session outlines and learning objectives

This session will cover:

The importance of preconception nutrition and lifestyle for all people of reproductive age
Preconception nutrition, lifestyle recommendations and adherence
Strategies to improve preconception health

Watch this session to:

GAIN CLEAR UNDERSTANDING OF:

  • Why optimal nutrition and lifestyle before pregnancy are important
  • Recommendations for preconception nutrition and lifestyle

BE AWARE OF:

  • The challenges of defining the preconception period and population
  • The knowledge of and level of adherence to preconception nutrition and lifestyle recommendations

BE ABLE TO:

  • Use meaningful and appropriate language to communicate about ‘preconception health’ – a term which means very little to the general public
  • Identify opportunities to promote preconception nutrition and lifestyle
Melissa Mogor

12:30 – 13:10

Plant-based diets in pregnancy: risks and recommendations

Dr Jessica Rigutto-Farebrother
Senior Assistant & Lecturer, ETH Zürich

Dr Jessica Rigutto-Farebrother’s biography:
Dr Rigutto-Farebrother is a Senior Assistant and Lecturer at the Human Nutrition Laboratory, ETH Zürich, and a registered nutritionist mBANT. She holds master’s degrees in Pharmacy and Public Health, and a Doctor of Science in Human Nutrition. She specialises in addressing micronutrient deficiencies across all life stages and population groups, through novel applications and supporting public health policy.
Session outlines and learning objectives

Plant-based diets are gaining popularity for both their health benefits and responding to ethical and environmental concerns. Yet not all plant-based diets are the same. When pregnant women or those looking to conceive wish to follow a plant-based diet, nutrient content is a critical consideration.

Watch this session to:

GAIN CLEAR UNDERSTANDING OF:

  • The reasons why people may choose to follow a plant-based diet, including some not-so-obvious reasons to be aware of
  • Important macro- and micronutrients in pregnancy and their sources in plant-based diets
  • Critical or potentially critical nutrients with higher risks of deficiency in plant-based diets

BE AWARE OF:

  • The risks of following a plant-based diet during pregnancy
  • Antinutrients in plant-based diets and how to counteract their effects
  • Emerging market trends in the plant-based industry

BE ABLE TO:

  • Describe alternative nutrient sources in plant-based diets to reduce risk of nutritional deficiency
  • Better relate to women who are pregnant and wishing to follow a plant-based diet
  • Assist in planning an ideal plant-based diet in pregnancy

13:20 Lunch break

Melissa Mogor

14:00 – 14:40

Nutritional management of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM)

Nardos Yemane
Senior Diabetes Specialist Dietitian, Guy’s & St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust

Nardos Yemane’s biography:
Nardos Yemane is a Senior Diabetes Specialist Dietitian at Guy’s & St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, with over 20 years of extensive clinical experience.
She works in an extended role as part of a multidisciplinary team, is the DAFNE lead and an insulin pump educator. Nardos also participates in research and is currently the principle investigator for the DAFNEplus research study.
Session outlines and learning objectives

In GDM, nutritional management is as important as medication and often first line treatment, as it can help to control blood sugars, avoid excessive weight gain and ensure the baby has all the nutrients it needs for healthy growth and development. Carbohydrate restriction remains the most common approach for nutritional management in GDM. However, it is essential to provide individualised advice supported by regular follow-up with a dietitian addressing nutrition education and healthy eating.

Watch this session to:

GAIN CLEAR UNDERSTANDING OF:

  • Aims of nutritional recommendations
  • Practical dietary advice
  • Management of weight gain during pregnancy

BE AWARE OF:

  • Personal and cultural preferences
  • Health literacy and numeracy
  • Access to healthy food choices
  • Willingness and ability to make behavioral changes, as well as barriers to change

BE ABLE TO:

  • Refer to a dietitian
  • Give evidence based consistent nutritional advice
  • Support with practical advice
Melissa Mogor

14:40 – 15:20

Maternal nutritional interventions in life course research

Professor Lucilla Poston CBE
Head of School of Life Course and Population Sciences, King’s College London, Tommy’s Professor of Maternal and Fetal Health, President, International Society for Developmental Origins of Health and Disease

Professor Lucilla Poston’s biography:
Professor Lucilla Poston is Head of School of Life Course and Population Sciences at Kings College London (KCL). She holds the Tommy’s Charity Chair of Maternal and Fetal Health. A graduate in Physiology (University College London) with a PhD in the field of medicine, she directs a multidisciplinary team of scientists and health professionals which she established in 1995, located within Guy’s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London. Professor Poston is a Fellow ad eundem of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG), a National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Senior Investigator (emeritus) and a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences, UK. She is a member of the UK Government’s Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN), a Member of the UK Medical Research Council’s Global Health Board and President of the International Society for the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease. In 2017, Professor Poston was honoured by Her Majesty the Queen as a CBE (Commander of the British Empire) for her services to Women’s Health.
Session outlines and learning objectives
The majority of studies addressing the effect of maternal nutrition on the longer-term health of the child have been observational in nature, and causality is difficult to prove due to the potential for residual confounding.

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of a relevant dietary intervention are the gold standard for determining whether relationships are causal. Many RCTs of nutritional interventions in pregnancy have been negative and often appear not to support the hypothesis that maternal nutritional status is an important determinant of child health. However, suboptimal study design, compliance and lack of efficacy of the intervention to change maternal dietary behaviours need to be considered before discarding the hypothesis proposed. These issues will be discussed with references to example from the literature.

Watch this session to:

GAIN CLEAR UNDERSTANDING OF:

  • Maternal nutrition and its relationship with child health
  • Evidence from RCTs of nutritional interventions
  • Issues with studies addressing the effect of maternal nutrition on child health

BE AWARE OF:

  • How nutrition in pregnancy can affect child health
  • Current evidence from RCTs of nutrition interventions in pregnancy
  • Issues and controversies with the current evidence

BE ABLE TO:

  • Summarise how maternal nutrition is linked to child health
  • Summarise evidence from RCTs underpinning maternal nutritional interventions and their effect on child outcomes
  • Explain issues with study designs and interventions with examples from the literature

15:30 Break

Melissa Mogor

15:40 – 16:20

Hyperemesis Gravidarum: consequences and management

Dr Melanie Nana
Clinical Research Fellow, Obstetric Medicine Registrar, King’s College London

Dr Melanie Nana’s biography
Melanie is an Obstetric Medicine trainee and co-chair of the Royal College of Physicians Trainee Committee. Melanie is currently undertaking a clinical research fellowship in the Williamson Group at King’s College London, where she is studying the mechanisms underpinning the neurocognitive and metabolic consequences of children born to women with severe Hyperemesis Gravidarum.
Session outlines and learning objectives
Hyperemesis Gravidarum (HG) affects up to 3% of the pregnant population and describes vomiting in pregnancy severe enough to cause weight loss and dehydration. HG renders women so physically and mentally unwell that 5% are driven to terminate wanted pregnancy and 7% suffer suicidal ideation. Evidence-based treatment is required to prevent short and long-term complications both for the mother and unborn child.

Watch this session to:

GAIN CLEAR UNDERSTANDING OF:

  • How to recognise and investigate HG
  • The consequences of HG on maternal nutrition and the effects this has on maternal and fetal short- and long-term health
  • Understand the principles of evidence-based treatment

BE AWARE OF:

  • The short- and long-term effects that HG has on women and their unborn children
  • The consequences of nutrient deficiency in this patient group
  • The management required to treat women with HG

BE ABLE TO:

  • Recognise the signs and symptoms of HG
  • Understand the nutritional consequences of HG
  • Recommend evidence-based therapies for HG

16:30 Wrap up and Close

FAQs

1. I am unable to attend the live symposium, can I still access the material?

Yes, if you have registered and paid for the symposium in advance of the event date but cannot attend you will receive a unique link and access code to view the recording of the full symposium and individual sessions via email after the event. Please do allow up to a week for the recordings to be processed and check your junk/spam folders before contacting us.

2. Can I register for the event after the event has taken place?

Yes. Access to the recording of the full symposium and individual sessions will be available to purchase after the event has taken place. After you have registered and paid your access fee, you will be sent a unique link and access code to view the recording of the full symposium and individual sessions via email. You will be able to register for the full session for £30 and individual sessions for £8 each. Please allow up to a week for registrations to be processed and check your junk/spam folders before contacting us.

3. I registered but haven’t received a confirmation email.

Please check your spam/junk folders. If you can’t find the email, contact hello@mynutriweb.com with your full name and payment receipt.

4. Why is this event not free, when others usually are?

The symposium is priced at £30 for the full event to enable us to cover some of the running costs and continue to provide you with the highest quality e-learning, whilst ensuring that it is still accessible. A portion of the registration fee will go to the Department of Women and Children’s Health at King’s College London.

Included in the registration fee you will gain access to 6.5 hours of CPD with leading experts in preconception and pregnancy nutrition and health. After the live event, you will also receive speaker presentations, on-demand access to the full symposium and individual sessions to refer back to for at least 12 months, and your personalised CPD certificate for your records. A student discount is available (see separate question).

5. I'm a student, can I get a discount?

Yes, we are offering a student discount of 50% (£15). To receive your discount code, before registering please email hello@mynutriweb.com with your full name and a photo of your student ID.

6. Do I have to attend all the symposium sessions?

Registration to the symposium gives you access to the live event and individual session recordings after the event. You can use the same access link to join the live event at intervals throughout the day and will still have access to the full event recording and any sessions you missed live after the event. Your CPD certificate from the live event will reflect the total time you joined for.

7. Do I get a CPD certificate?

Yes, personalised CPD certificates will be emailed to attendees within seven days of watching. Each certificate is personalised to include the total length of time you attended the live symposium. If you watch individual sessions on demand, you will receive an individual certificate for each. Please note, if you attend the event for less than 30 minutes you won’t qualify for a CPD certificate.

8. What if I need to cancel?

If you can no longer attend the session, you will be able to access the recordings of the session on-demand for up to 12 months after the live event. However, if you wish to cancel your registration entirely please contact us in writing by emailing hello@mynutriweb.com by midnight BST 8 June 2022 for a partial refund of £27 (full price of the symposium excluding £3 processing costs). Cancellations received after the stated deadline will not be eligible for a refund. All refund requests must be made by the attendee or credit card holder. Refund requests must include the name of the attendee and the email address used to register. Refunds will be credited back to the original credit card used for payment, please allow 10 working days.

CPD CERTIFICATE & LEARNING MATERIALS

This symposium has been approved for CPD by the BDA

Application for CPD approval has been made to the AfN

You are welcome to attend individual sessions. CPD certificates will be issued based on length of total time attended.

 

Webinar slides and links to other key resources will be sent within a week of viewing the live webinar, along with a separate personalised CPD certificate to save for your files. Add hello@mynutriweb.com to your safe senders to ensure you receive them.

This webinar is being run in association with Department of Women and Children’s Health at Kings College London

The research of the Department of Women and Children’s Health at King’s College London, centres around the concept of the life course of health. The health of the next generation begins at the earliest stages, the research spans preconception, maternity, infancy and adolescence.

Please note, approval of our partners and activity is carefully assessed for suitability on a case by case basis. Partnership does not imply any endorsement of the brand by MyNutriWeb, its organisers, its moderators or any participating healthcare professional, or their association.

Please note, approval of each sponsor and activity is carefully assessed for suitability on a case by case basis. Sponsorship does not imply any endorsement of the brand by MyNutriWeb, its organisers, its moderators or any participating healthcare professional, or their association. Sponsorship funds are reinvested into the creation and promotion of professional development opportunities on MyNutriWeb.

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